SpanCommEd

 

Adult Conversational SpanishInstructor


| Description | Whyis it Representative? | Appraisal|
| Improval of CurrentPractice | Exhibit |


Reflection:

Description ofArtifact:

 

Why is this exhibitrepresentative of the identified competency and what makes itsignificant

 

Appraisal of theexperience as it relates to your values and beliefs.

 

Can this experiencehelp you improve current practice? How?

 


Exhibit:

 

Exhibit:

St. Paul Community Education Spanish Conversation I & II

El IdiomaCastellano/The Castillian Language | AbbreviationsUsed In This Handout | Saludos/Greetings| ¿Cómoestás?/How are you? | Introduciones/Introductions| Colores/Colores | Números1-20 | Paises/Countries |Algunos AdjetivosComunes/Some Common Adjectives | Profesiones/Professions| Pasaportes/Passports |Despedidos/Goodbyes | Expresiones/Expressions | Palabras Utiles|NotasGramaticales/Grammatical Notes |

Greg Anderson, Instructor
Work Phone 298-1595
Fax 298-1598
Home Phone 227-3027


El IdiomaCastellano/The Castillian Language *

* Condensed from the University of Chicago Spanish/English dictionary

Today Spanish (Castellano or español) is the most extensivemanifestation of the spoken Latin. There are more than 300,000,000speakers of the language who live in more than 20 countries. Spanishis also a rapidly growing language in the United States. It isimportant to briefly understand the history of the language to havean understanding of what we are studying.


Spain

The speech of Roman soldiers, merchants and colonists, the spokenLatin of another day, was taken bodily into Iberia (Spain) and manyother areas of the Roman Empire. The Latin spoken by these personsdiffered from the Classical written Latin, and was also changed byits daily contact with speakers of Iberian languages. These Latin ofthese spoken dialects developed into the Romance Languages - Spanish,Portuguese, Catalan Provençal, French, Rhaeto-Romansch,Italian, Romanian, Ladino, etc. The Latin of north central Spain cameto be called Castillian (castellano), since its speakers were fromthe region of Castilla. (Both English and Spanish are part of theIndo-European Language Family, the largest language family in theworld. English derived from the Germanic branch of this family, hencethe many similarities between the two.)

Indo European Language Family

Although the language is often called Spanish, its correct name isCastillian. This is a very important distinction in Spain, whereCastillian is never referred to as Spanish as it would be an insultto the many native speakers of Basque, Gallician and Catalan, theother official languages of Spain. These areas have struggled longand hard to have their languages and customs officially recognized.It is important that any student of Spanish recognize this fact asmany native speakers refer to the language as castellano.

Castillian became prominent among the other Latin dialects (thedialects of León, Aragon, Galicia and Catalunya known asleónes, aragonés, gallego and catalan respectively) inSpain because of the role that the Christians of north central Spainplayed in the reconquista (reconquest) of the peninsula from theArabs, Moors, and Muslims who had conquered almost all of thepeninsula between 711 and 718. (These Arab groups peacefullyco-existed for the most part with the Christians and Jews of Spainduring the 800 years that they occupied Spain. As a result of thisoccupation, Spanish has a distinctly Arabic flavor to it that is notfound in other Romance languages. Many of the words that are used inSpanish are Arabic or derived from Arabic.)

However, the Christians were uncomfortable with the Moors thatoccupied Spain and spent 800 years slowly driving them southwardtoward Africa. After finally taking their last stronghold, Granada,in 1492, the Christians, who were culturally Castillian, were able toconcentrate on matters outside their peninsula. With the reconquistaover, the Christians of Spain turned their expansionist fervor inother directions.

The growth of the political expansion that resulted from thereconquista was expanded in many directions. The Spainsh set sail bythe thousands on voyages of discovery, trade and settlement of thenew world and old worlds. The predominance of Castillian/Spanish overthe other dialects/languages of Spain continued to grow and was notdue to any linguistic factors, but rather political and militaryorganization, church/state relations and literary ascendancy.

The Spanish of the New World developed in many respects in thesame way that Spanish developed in Spain. The Spanish that firstarrived in the Americas was the Spanish of soldiers. These soldierswere often poorly educated and their Spanish reflected that. TheSpanish of Latin America, like most "colonial" speech, tends to beconservative in its structural changes compared with that of themother country. In addition, it reflects regional traits of thesouthwestern part of Spain, notably Andalucia and Extremadura, fromwhere a large part of the sailors, conquistadores and colonists came.(If they did not originally come from these areas, the long time theyspent in waiting for ships in Sevilla and in transit tended to affecttheir speech with southernisms.). In other words, the Spanish of theAmericas would seem to be Andalusian Castillian of the 16th and 17thcenturies, as far as pronunciation and grammar are concerned. Thevocabulary, however, has expanded rapidly. Since 1492, the languagehas encountered new items: plants, peoples, animals, etc. for whichthey had no names. Spanish often adopted new words from foreignlanguages in the new world such as Náhuatel (Aztec) andQuechua (Andean region of South America). In modern times, French andEnglish have also supplied important contributions to Spanish.Spanish is a very international language used in many parts of theworld. Hopefully, your initial exposure to the language will lead toa life-long love for castellano.

For more detailed information on the history of the Spanishlanguage, consult the preface of the University of ChicagoSpanish/English dictionary where much of this information wasobtained.


Abbreviations UsedIn This Handout

s.

Sustantivo/Noun

adj.

Adjetivo/Adjective

adv.

adverbio/adverb

conj.

conjunción/conjunction

art.def.

articulo definido/definite article

f.

feminina


Lección 1: Saludos, ¿Cómo Estás?,Nombres, Introducciones, Colores, Números 1-20, Paises,Adjetivoss, Profesiones, Pasaportes, Despedidos

Saludos/Greetings

Bienvenido/a

Welcome

Buenos días

Good day

Hola

Hello

¿Cómoestás?/How are you?

¿Cómo estás?

How are you (informal)

¿Cómo está Usted (señor/a)

How are you? (formal)

Estoy bien.

I am well

Estoy así así.

I am so so

Estoy cansado/a.

I am tired

Estoy fenómenal.

I am phenomenal

Estoy magnifico/a.

I am magnificent

Estoy mal.

I am bad.

Estoy medio medio

I am fair to middlin'

No estoy bien.

I am not well.

Tengo sueño

I am sleepy

Introduciones/Introductions

En esta clase Yo me llamo _____________________ (in this class, I call myself)

Me llamo ____________

My name is _____________ (I call myself __________)

¿Cómo te llamas?

What is your name? (informal form)

¿Cómo se llama Usted?

What is your name? (formal form)

Colores/Colores

amarillo/a

el

adj./s.

yellow

anaranjado/a

el

adj./s.

orange

azul

el

adj./s.

blue

blanco/a

el

adj./s.

white

café

el

adj./s.

brown (Latin America)

dorado

el

adj./s.

gold

gris

el

adj./s.

gray

marrón

el

adj./s.

brown (Spain)

morado/a

el

adj./s.

purple

negro/a

el

adj./s.

black

plateado

el

adj./s.

silver

rojo/a

el

adj./s.

red

rosado

el

adj./s.

pink

verde

el

adj./s.

green

color

el

s.

color

claro/a


adj.

light/clear

oscuro/a


adj.

dark

Números 1-20

uno/a

núm. card.

one

dos

núm. card.

two

tres

núm. card.

three

cuatro

núm. card.

four

cinco

núm. card.

five

seis

núm. card.

six

siete

núm. card.

seven

ocho

núm. card.

eight

nueve

núm. card.

nine

diez

núm. card.

ten

once

núm. card.

eleven

doce

núm. card.

twelve

trece

núm. card.

thirteen

catorce

núm. card.

fourteen

quince

núm. card.

fifteen

dieciséis (diez y seis)*

núm. card.

sixteen

diecisiete

núm. card.

seventeen

dieciocho

núm. card.

eighteen

diecinueve

núm. card.

nineteen

veinte

núm. card.

twenty

*The numbers can alternatively be written in this way.

Paises/Countries

español

el

s.

Spanish Language

castellano

el

s.

Spanish Language

Africa


s.

Africa

africano/a

el/la

adj./s.

African

aleman/a

el/la

adj./s.

German

Alemania


s.

Germany

Argentina


s.

Argentina

argentino/a

el/la

adj./s.

Argentinian

Boliva


s.

Bolivia

boliviano/a

el/la

adj./s.

Bolivian

Canadá


s.

Canada

canadiense

el/la

adj./s.

Canadian

Chile


s.

Chile

chileno/a

el/la

adj./s.

Chilean

China


s.

China

chino/a

el/la

adj./s.

Chinese

Colombia


s.

Colombia

colombiano/a


adj./s.

Colombian

Costa Rica


s.

Costa Rica

costarricense

el/la

adj./s.

Costa Rican

Cuba


s.

Cuba

cubano/a

el/la

adj./s.

Cuban

Ecuador


s.

Ecuador

ecuatoriano/a

el/la

adj./s.

Ecuadoran

El Salvador


s.

El Salvador

Salvadoreño

el/la

adj./s.

Salvadoran

España


s.

Spain

español/a

el/la

adj./s.

Spanish

Estados Unidos (de América)

s.

United States (of America)


estadounidense

el/la

adj./s.

American

norteamericano/a

el/la

adj./s.

North American




(American/Canadian)

américano/a

el/la

adj./s.

American

francés/a

el/la

adj./s.

French

Francia


s.

Francia

Guatemala


s.

Guatemala

guatemalteco/a

el/la

adj./s.

Guatemalan

Honduras


s.

Honduras

hondureño/a

el/la

adj./s.

Honduran

Inglaterra


s.

England

inglés/a

el/la

adj./s.

English

Irlanda


s.

Ireland´

irlandés/a

el/la

adj./s.

Irish

Italia


s.

Italy

italiano/a

el/la

adj./s.

Italian

Japón


s.

Japan

japónes/a

el/la

adj./s.

Japanese

Kenia


s.

Kenia

Kenio/a

el/la

adj./s.

Kenian

La Républica Dominicana

s.

Dominican Republic


dominicano/a


adj./s.

Dominican

méxicano/a

el/la

adj./s.

Mexican

México


s.

Mexico

Noruega


s.

Norway

noruego/a

el/la

adj./s.

Norwegian

Panamá


s.

Panama

panameño/a

el/la

adj./s.

Panamanian

Paraguay


s.

Paraguay

paraguayo/a

el/la

adj./s.

Paraguaian

Portugal


s.

Portugal

Portugués/a

el/la

adj./s.

Portuguese

Puerto Rico


s.

Puerto Rico

puertorriqueño

el/la

adj./s.

Puerto Rican

Rusia


s.

Rusia

ruso/a

el/la

adj./s.

Russian

Suecia


s.

Sweden

sueco/a

el/la

adj./s.

Swedish

Uruguay


s.

Uruguay

uruguayo/a

el/la

adj./s.

Uruguaian

Venezolano/a

el/la

adj./s.

Venezuelan

Venezuela


s.

Venezuela

Algunos AdjetivosComunes/Some Common Adjectives

antipático/a


adj.

unfriendly

simpático/a


adj.

friendly

gordo/a


adj.

fat

delgado/a


adj.

thin

feo/a


adj.

ugly

bonito/a


adj.

beautiful

activo/a


adj.

active

perezoso/a


adj.

lazy

triste


adj.

sad

feliz


adj.

happy

contento/a


adj.

content

rápido/a


adj.

fast

lento/a


adj.

slow

bajo/a


adj.

short

alto/a


adj.

tall

grande


adj.

big

pequeño


adj.

little

Profesiones/Professions

actor

el

s.

actor

actrice

la

s.

actress

bailarín

el

s.

male dancer

bailarina

la

s.

female dancer

bombero/a

el/la

s.

fireperson

cartera

la

s.

"wallet, briefcase"

cartero

el

s.

mailman

dentista

el/la

s.

dentist

hombre

el

s.

man

hombre de negocios

el

s.

businessman

maestro/a

el/la

s.

teacher

mecánico

el/la

s.

mechanic

mujer

la

s.

woman

mujer cartera

la

s.

mailwoman

mujer de negocios

la

s.

businesswoman

mujer policía

la

s.

policewoman

músico

el/la

s.

musician

payaso/a

el/la

s.

clown

piloto/a

el/la la

s.

pilot

policía

el

s.

policeman

policía

la

s.

police force

profesor/a

el/la

s.

professor

Pasaportes/Passports

  • Tu pasaporte por favor. Your passport please (informal)
  • Su pasaporte por favor (señor/a) Your passport please (formal)
  • ¿Tienes algo a declarar? Do you have anything to declare? (informal)
  • ¿Tiene algo a declarar Usted. (señor/a)? Do you have anything to declare? (formal)
  • Vengo de ___________ I come from _____________
  • ¿De dónde vienes? Where do you come from? (informal form)
  • ¿De dónde viene Usted? Where do you come from? (formal form)
  • Voy a ___________ I am going to _____________
  • ¿A dónde vas? Where are you going? (informal form)
  • ¿A dónde va Usted (señor/a)? Where are you going? (formal form)
  • Soy de ___________ I am from _____________
  • ¿De dónde eres? Where are you from? (informal form)
  • ¿De dónde es Usted? Where are you from? (formal form)
  • Soy __________ I am a _____________
  • ¿Cuál es tu profesión? What is your profession? (informal form)
  • ¿Cuál es su profesión (señor/a)? What is your profession? (formal form)
  • Mi color preferido es __________ My favorite color is _____________
  • ¿Cuál es tu color preferido? What is your favorite color? (informal form)
  • ¿Cuál es su color preferido (señor/a)? What is your favorite color? (formal form)

calle

la

s.

street

avenida

la

s.

avenue

paseo

el

s.

boulevard

Despedidos/Goodbyes

Adiós

Goodbye



Chau

Ciao



Hasta entonces

Until then



Hasta la vista

Until we see each other again



Hasta luego

Until later



Hasta mañana

Until tomorrow



Hasta pronto

Until soon



Vaya con Diós

Go with God



Expresiones/Expressions

Me llamo ____________

My name is _____________ (I call myself __________)

¿Cómo te llamas?

What is your name? (informal form)

¿Cómo se llama Usted?

What is your name? (formal form)

Vengo de ___________

I come from _____________

¿De dónde vienes?

Where do you come from? (informal form)

¿De dónde viene Usted?

Where do you come from? (formal form)

Soy de ___________

I am from _____________

¿De dónde eres?

Where are you from? (informal form)

¿De dónde es Usted?

Where are you from? (formal form)

Soy __________

I am a _____________

¿Cuál es tu profesión?

What is your profession? (informal form)

¿ Cuál es su profesión (señor/a)?

What is your profession? (formal form)

Palabras Utiles

y


conj.

and

de


prep.

"from, of, about"

el


art. def.

the (masculine singular)

la


art. def.

the (feminine singular)

los


art. def.

the (masc./mixed group plural)

las


art. def.

the (feminine plural)

un/uno/una


art. indef.

a/an

unos/unas


art. indef.

some

Señor

el

s.

Mister/Sir

Señora

la

s.

Mrs./Ma'am

Señorita

la

s.

Miss


NotasGramaticales/Grammatical Notes

Genero/Gender

Masculine Nouns

  1. Names of male beings are naturally masculine: el hombre the man; el muchacho the boy; el tío the uncle; el rey the king; el buey the ox.
  2. Nouns ending in -o are masculine: el libro the book; el banco the bank.
  3. exception: la mano the hand; la radio the radio
  4. Days of the week, months, rivers, oceans and mountains are masculine: el martes Tuesday; enero January; el Pacífico the Pacific; el Rin The Rhine; los Andes the Andes.
  5. Most nouns in -l or -r, and nouns of Greek origin ending in -ma are masculine: el papel the paper; el azúcar the sugar; el favor the favor; el drama the drama/

Common exceptions: la miel the honey. la sal the salt; la catedral the cathedral; la flor the flower. note that mar (sea) can be wither masculine or feminine.

Feminine Nouns

  1. Names of female beings are naturally feminine: la mujer the woman; la muchacha the girl; la tía the aunt; la reina the queen; la vaca the cow.
  2. Nouns ending in -a are feminine: la pluma the pen; la carta the letter; la casa the house. Common exceptions: el día the day; el mapa the map; nouns of Greek origin ending in -ma: el dogma the dogma; el trauma the trauma, el programa the program.
  3. letters of the alphabet are feminine: el e; la s; la t.
  4. Nouns ending in -ión, -tad, -dad, -tud, -umbre are feminine: la canción the song; la facultad the faculty; la ciudad the city; la virtud the virture; la muchadumbre the crowd. exceptions: el gorrión the sparrow, el sarampión the measles, el camión the truck; el avión the plane.

Formation of the Feminine

  1. Nouns ending in -ochange -o to -a: tío uncle, tía aunt; muchacho boy, muchacha girl.
  2. Nouns ending in -án and -án add -a: patrón patron, patróna patroness; pastor shepherd, pastora shepherdess; holgazón lazy man, holgazóna lazy woman.
  3. Certain nouns have a special form for the feminine: el poeta the poet, la poetisa the poetess; el cantante the singer, la cantatriz the singer; el sacerdote the priest, la sacerdotisa the priest; el emperador the emperor, la emperatriz the empress; el abad the abbot, la abadesa the abbess; el conde the duke, la condesa the duchess; el duque the duke, la duquesa the duchess.

Plural of Nouns

  1. Nouns ending in unaccented vowels add -s to form the plural: el libro, los libros; la casa, las casas.
  2. Nouns ending in a consonant, in -y, or in an accented vowel add -es: el papel, los papeles; la canción, las canciones; la ley, los leyes; el rubí, los rubies. exception: the accpeted plurals of papá papa and mamá mama are papás and mamás respectively. .
  3. Nouns ending in unaccented -es and -is do not change in the plural: el lunes Monday , los lunes Mondays; la tesis the thesis, las tesis the theses.

 

 

Saint Paul Public Schools, District 625 | 360 Colborne Street, Saint Paul, MN, 55102|651-767-8100|communications@spps.org